Posts Tagged ‘comics’

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(Had this sitting in my drafts for about a week… time to finish it up and push it out!)

After setting up my Wacom Graphire tablet on my laptop (copy-pasting some xorg.conf stuff) I decided to leave it on my bed. If I leave it on, with the Gimp (graphic application) open and the tablet plugged in, I will often do a little doodle before going to sleep. So these have been done while lying down, usually in (much) less than 5 minutes.

One thing I really like about comics is the expression (often exaggerated) portrayed through the characters’ faces.

This is something I don’t really have much practice with, so I started looking at some online comics that are good at it (and that I read): Penny Arcade, Octopus Pie, Butternutsquash, C&H… (Note: xkcd is excellent but obviously doesn’t even use facial expressions.)

PA Gabe, clearly very happy and excited

And this will be a good test of wordpress’ new gallery functionality combined with my hacky theme: I present, doodle gallery!!

An online comic is something I would love to do, but I would need to develop characters and story and be committed. 😮 Trying to illustrate different expressions is fun. Now accepting ideas. 🙂

Watching and Reading

(Online) Comics I’ve been reading

  • Butternut Squash – Start at the beginning. Polished style. Crude humour. Hilarious. (Thanks for pointing this out, Jon!)
  • Kukuburi – Start at the beginning. Elaborate style. Adventure. Bit of a slow start. Actually the plot’s still unravelling, but the art is pretty and the story is getting interesting. (By the same guy as BNS.)
  • Octopus Pie – Start at the beginning. Well written. Funny. Simple style.
  • Basic Instructions – Start Anywhere. Sterile “instruction manual illustration” style. *gasp!* Kinda wordy, but has its moments.

Some fascinating TED videos I’ve been watching

Some books I’ve been reading

  • Python – Essential Reference by David Beasley: This book is exactly what it says; an essential reference. The first section is an incredibly concise introduction to Python and should be read by everyone. The rest is nice to scan over to see what’s available and keep as a reference. I’d compare it to the K&R C programming book. This book is meant for programmers.
  • The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman: Pretty much considered required reading material for usability folk. Well written, lots of examples, and often entertaining.
  • Character Design for Mobile Devices by NFGMan: I’ve looked at every beautiful, full-colour page. Some great pixel art and history in here. But I’ve read almost nothing. I didn’t really get it to read, I guess. Makes my desk look h-a-w-t.

Providing a Service

On my last post, my friend, Jesse, commented on how he had a dilemma while designing a website for a client. His problem was that his client is not technically oriented. What clients are? That’s why they’re clients. 🙂 Anyway, since he liked my recent graphic efforts so much, I decided to illustrate the simplest solution to his problem in another diagram. Enjoy.

I tried to create it so that Jesse could relate to it. It works best if you picture it taking place on some seedy street. And you picture the person on the right being named “Jesse.” Not sure why that helps, but it does. And the burly mustache man on the left (he’s burly, trust me)… well, he breathes heavily. More like grunting, really.

Almost 2, going on 4

Technical diagram of technicalness

I renewed my domain name for another two years. For some reason, I felt inclined to make this:

Some random links